Font pairing guide and ideas

I am always looking to learn new things. I have always loved discovering new marketing ideas, image trends (I love the new “desktop images” trend. Pretty), design ideas and everything in between. And truly, if you keep looking for new things, you keep learning about new things. There seems to never be an end to this. This is a good thing. Always be a student is what I say.

In design, as you can imagine, the possibilities are ENDLESS. Times change, people change, technology changes and we just all kind-a “grow with the flow” (or not).

One of my favorite things to learn about and work on are graphics. Particularly when it comes to text style logos. Adobe + Apple + Microsoft (long story) introduced additional typography sometime in the early 80’s. Since then, the ideas and styles and types of fonts produced by brilliant designers is nothing short of amazing. My favorite hub for really neat free fonts is http://dafont.com.

When you have TONS of fonts to pick from, we should also follow some guidance as to which fonts really works well with other fonts so that your designs, brand assets and logos look appealing, and the user experience is optimal. This is what font designers (and graphic, web and print designers) call “Font Pairings”. It is truly an art. I myself look up ideas from time to time in order to produce eye catching easy flowing font combinations.

There are some “rules” to design. Much like there are “courtesy” rules, or “the rule of 1/3 third” in photography. Of course, I know, as artist we challenge these often, however, they remain at least the foundation by which we teach others. After all, you must first need to know about notes, and sound, and music in general before you can create your own melody. Same with cooking: who ever thought fried pickles would be a thing right? LOL (they are yum, btw).

In the case of font pairings, there are also suggested guidelines on which fonts go best together. Such as: don’t use more than two “script style” fonts together. They will clash. Use script with a blockier font to make the two compliment each other. Always go with your gut and preference and what resonates with your brand though.

Here are some font pairing guides from other bloggers (I don’t claim an expertise in this area), + a link to font pairing ideas I’ve been collecting on Pinterest.

PS: I keep my subscribers up to date with all these cool design concepts & ideas so feel free to subscribe to my updates here (you will also get a copy of my Royal SEO Guide for increasing your blog’s visibility)

FONT PAIRING GUIDE REFERENCES

From Canva: The Ultimate Guide to Font Pairing

Creative Market: 10 Infographics On How to Mix Fonts Like a Pro

PicMonkey’ Blog: Font Pairing Like A Pro

SOME FONT PAIRING IDEAS

Now, if you are not really interested in learning THAT MUCH about font pairings (lol, I get it) and you just want some ideas, then check out my PINTEREST FONT PAIRING BOARD. And afterwards, you can download free fonts from http://dafont.com. That’s my go-to font store. Creative Market has some cool fonts too, but not necessarily free (but good).

Make sure to subscribe if you’d like to stay in touch. See you soon!

 

 

 

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